Posts Tagged ‘learning’

Performing Arts as Pedagogy

by Christopher Parker Part of my Classical Mythology course requires students to attend a live dramatic or artistic performance. Not only are my students benefitting from the rich mythology themes often present in live performance, but most theater offerings and arts performances are rich with conceptual undertones of psychology, language, literature, physics, biology, technology, history, […]

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Experiments in Creative Approaches to Science Education, by Mika Munakata and Ashwin Vaidya

By Dr. Mika Munakata, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Montclair State University and Dr. Ashwin Vaidya, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Montclair State University “Newton’s second law of motion states…” In reconsidering the effectiveness of this typical script in any beginning physics course, it strikes us that while the standard method of conveying scientific information may work […]

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The Intersection of Arts Programming and Teaching and Learning: Creative Thinking

by Julie Dalley In a studio classroom, 12 students sit in a circle, look around themselves and at each other, and peer curiously at a gang of course instructors milling about the room. They are the inaugural class members of Creative Thinking,1 an experimental new course offered at Montclair State University designed to generate unique […]

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Waking the Contemplative Mind on Campus

Waking the Contemplative Mind on Campus by David Lee Keiser What is contemplative practice? Contemplative practices are activities that can quiet the mind in order to cultivate a personal capacity for deep concentration and insight. While many of us think of silent meditation as the main contemplative practice, other examples include contemplative prayer, mindful walking […]

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Silence as a Teaching Tool: Meditation in the Classroom

Teachers fill their classes with sound. A lecture or assignment that excites a lively class discussion is deemed successful. It is also productive to fill them occasionally with silence. There is no exercise that my students enjoy more than silent meditation. They say they are under a lot of pressure, and a few minutes of […]

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Learning How to Learn: A Mandate for Change in Today’s College Classroom

 “It is not the subject per se that is educative or conducive to growth…There is no such thing as educational value in the abstract.” – John Dewey, “Criteria of Experience,” in Experience & Education, 1938. “Students’ long-term success does not depend upon short-term business cycles or the technical demands of the latest ‘hot’ industry.” – […]

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